Interview with Maribel Steel

Maribel Steel is a writer, speaker, blogger, mother and vocalist. She lives in Melbourne, Australia and has been legally blind since the age of seventeen with Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP). She says her passion is to write and dispel some of the myths held by others about living with a disability – and shares her life experiences through presentations and insightful short stories. Exceptions editor-in-chief Craig Pearson spoke to Ms. Steel about her background and her inspirations.

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Interview with Kristen Witucki | Part Two

Kristen Witucki is a writer and teacher based in West Virginia, where she lives with her husband James, her son Langston, and her Seeing Eye dog, a black lab named Tad. Witucki’s fiction has been featured in numerous publications, including Exceptions, where her story “Test Run” was spotlighted in our Fall 2013 issue. Click here for that story, and click here for Part One of our interview with Kristen, in which she discusses her experiences, her influences, and how blindness has shaped her art. Read below for Part Two of our interview.

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Interview with Kristen Witucki | Part One

Kristen Witucki is a writer and teacher based in West Virginia, where she lives with her husband James, her son Langston, and her Seeing Eye dog, a black lab named Tad. Witucki’s fiction has been featured in numerous publications, including Exceptions, where her story “Test Run” was spotlighted in our Fall 2013 issue. Click here for that story, and read below for Part One of our interview with Kristen, in which she discusses her experiences, her influences, and how blindness has shaped her art.

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Spring 2014 “Ways of Seeing” Contest

“Language gives a fuller image, which is all the better for being vague.
After all, the true seeing is within…”

So writes George Eliot in her classic novel Middlemarch. As a platform for blind writers and artists, the Exceptions community has an interest in what “true seeing” actually means, and how we depict it in writing, art, and multimedia. In the arts, loss of sight or atypical ways of seeing can serve as symbols for inner conflict; at other times, they afford characters a unique and sometimes superior perspective. This is what allows the synesthetic protagonist of Wendy Mass’s novel A Mango-Shaped Space to say: “All those people in their black-and-white worlds—they have no idea what they’re missing.”

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