By Morgan Hanks 

It was a place like cigarette breaks. Like drinking mimosas on Sunday. We can climb into the folds of this metaphor and never find her name. Because just like the moon goes away, the sun goes away, we drink the water up, and the time goes away, she goes away too. It’s like the melting wax of a candle. Like tying your shoelaces and they come untied. Meeting someone you think you have met, but haven’t met, and maybe, if you believe in other lives, you know you love them too much now to have never loved them before.  It’s a time like the early hours, the smell like dew. It is tasting your hatred. The hate tastes like burned espresso beans, only you have to keep chewing. It is a place like mud and sadness. Your shoes get dirty. We can eat the popcorn but it will get stuck in our teeth. Or we could get stuck, or we could be ok. It’s all like maple syrup and uncertainty.


The Creator’s Perspective

Morgan Hanks

Morgan is a Senior Creative Writing Student at Michigan State. She wants to change the world.

How did creating poetry for this accessible exhibit change your artistic process or perspective?
I wanted to write using things that were tangible. It’s hard to make touchable art out of an idea, so I really focused on tactile objects as metaphors. I also wanted to incorporate all five senses in my writing, in order to be inclusive.

How did it feel watching guests engage with your poetry?
I stood back for awhile and watched others read or listen to my poetry and then feel the pieces of art created. It was interesting to see facial reactions. I wanted to jump in and explain the poem, but I think that would have taken away some of the magic that this exhibit embodied. I was able to talk with an artist who made a piece of art from my poem, and hearing his challenges in creating helped to showcase a new perspective on my writing.

Colin Murray

Colin was born in Virginia and has lived most of his life in Michigan. He is currently a Junior at MSU pursuing a Studio Art Degree with a discipline in Photography.

How did creating art for this accessible exhibit change your artistic process or perspective?
Creating this work of art required me to constantly keep changing and evolving my original idea. It demanded that I evolved with the project and keep the physical aspect of the project above everything else. The experience of touch was the most important part and required constantly

How did it feel watching guests engage with art?
The best feeling I had was watching people take photos of my piece. It meant they wanted to preserve the piece and be able to view it again. Taking a picture also meant that I was able to succeed not only on the physical level, but on the visual level.

How To Be Everything You Never Wanted To Be Art

"How To Be Everything You Never Wanted To Be" by Katelyn Kmet

Katelyn Kmet
How To Be Everything You Never Wanted To Be
Mixed Media

 

"How To Be Everything You Never Wanted To Be" by Colin Murray

Colin Murray
How To Be Everything You Never Wanted To Be
Mixed Media

 

:How To Be Everything You Never Wanted To Be"  by Emily Simenauer

Emily Simenauer
How To Be Everything You Never Wanted To Be
Mixed Media

 

Photos courtesy of the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum.